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Why did The Black Church & HIV: The Social Justice Imperative initiative end?

The Black Church & HIV: The Social Justice Imperative initiative exceeded the goals set through its Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to Action. This included:

  • Training more than 2,000 faith leaders on how to address HIV as a social justice issue from the pulpit. Estimates show that through training, we reached 1.4 million Black Church congregants.
  • Conducting 45 faith leader trainings on how to address HIV as a social justice issue across 30 cities with the greatest HIV burden.
  • Integrating HIV related materials into required course curricula at five predominately black seminaries.
  • Obtaining formal resolutions from seven mainstream denominations to incorporate HIV messaging into Church activities and endorsements from 11 denominations supporting initiative messaging.

 

In an evaluation of the initiative, evaluators found that:

  • 96 percent of participants agreed that the town halls were valuable to attend.
  • 95 percent would recommend the town hall to other faith leaders who want to learn about HIV/AIDS as a social justice issue.
  • On average after the town halls, faith leader participants were more likely to:
    • Display HIV/AIDS education and prevention brochures at church events or invite a local HIV/AIDS expert to address the church and/or participate in health fairs;
    • Talk to others about HIV/AIDS as a social justice issue in church;
    • Preach from the pulpit about HIV/AIDS as a social justice issue;
    • Pray publicly about HIV/AIDS as a social justice issue;
    • Offer HIV testing at church;
    • Using church settings to promote routine HIV testing in clinical settings;
    • Incorporate activities around HIV/AIDS as a social justice issue into an existing ministry;
    • Offer HIV/AIDS prevention education programs for church and community members; and
    • Partner with HIV/AIDS organizations (e.g. care and treatment agencies, community-based organizations).